Declawing is Not All Bad

by Anonymous

I'm putting in a defense of declawing. All of my cats have been declawed and none have changed personality-wise, nor have they experienced much pain.

The declawing procedure you describe is the traditional method which involves using a scalpel or oversized nail-clipper-like tool to make an incision. There is new technology out there which uses lasers.

These cauterize while cutting and therefore damage the nerve endings to prevent the cat from feeling pain. By the time the nerve endings are restored, the wounds have healed and there's no longer any tenderness.

My cats were trying to jump around, play, and scratch only a day after declaw because they had no clue their claws were gone.

Also, depending on living situations and agreement, I am sure cats would rather be declawed and able to live in an apartment or loving home than still be at the humane society and face the possibility of being put down.

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Hi Anonymous,

Thank you for sharing your opinion. I agree that it is a better option than being put down or living out a life in a shelter.

However, even if medical advances have made the surgery pain-free, I would still argue that cats still suffer structurally over time, as a result of not being able to stretch properly, and troublesome effects on their shoulders and hip joints also occur.

My primary intent in writing this article is to bring awareness to new cat and kitten owners that this procedure is not to be taken lightly.

Yes, I have been accused of blowing this out of proportion going right to the worst-case scenarios, but these consequences affecting even a small fraction of animals should be enough to make cat owners take pause and think if there may not be a better alternative for their pet.

I will research more closely the advances in laser technology, and I will make the edit to the article and photos if warranted.

I appreciate your contribution, and I'm glad your kitties handled the surgery well.

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Predicament
by: Anonymous

My cat is a 4.5yr male and my parents had him declawed at the same time as he was fixed as a kitten. I face a predicament now when I look at getting him a kitten friend (he gets so lonely when my partner and I go to work). I don't want the kitten friend to boss him around because he/she has claws, THAT would create a personality change for my little boy, but I also see all these articles on declawing.

My cat is healthy and happy, I don't see any outward signs that he's in pain. I can touch his paws and joints and he doesn't mind at all. We had a very loving vet so I'm sure everything was done appropriately. He "scratches" items with his paws and yes he uses his teeth to get our attention by biting on things, but that's only when he wants something I think he's learned it as an alternative. When we playfight he'll use his back claws or teeth which I think is only natural.

In short, he seems completely fine and what I'm worried about is that if I get him a friend he WON'T be fine and he won't be the alpha like he should be with seniority. We've already noticed this once when we fostered a clawed cat. But I also don't want to start a cycle that each kitten into my home is declawed (I would never declaw a cat) in fear of psychological effects to the others.

Hm predicament.

Declaw
by: Tamara

I agree with the person who posted about the declaw.

I too, had total of five cats the four were declawed no problems. The cats behaved normally and healed rather quickly.

My fifth kitten Charlie will soon be neutered and declawed, he will be four and a half months old when this is going to be done.

My vet is a loving, caring vet and will not declaw after the kitten is older than five months.

I am taking the day off when I pick up my little Charlie so I can keep an eye on him when he comes home from the hospital.

I personally would not declaw after five months either but like the vet said before that age the claws are soft like cartilage so it is not as bad.

My cats have always been strictly indoor cats, had the run of the house and are spoiled rotten.

I suffocate them in hugs and kisses all the time and they eat the best cat food on the market.

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